Gratitude

On Monday I started the 11 Day Anxiety Challenge. Wednesday’s task was to find five things you are grateful for. Here are my five things:

  1. My family – My husband and sons mean everything to me.
  2. My house – I am so happy I am able to afford my home. I have worked very hard over the years to make it a lovely place to live.
  3. Exercise – I am very glad I am physically able to exercise since I have interstitial cystitis which is so debilitating for so many people.
  4. Ice skating – The reasons for being grateful for exercise hold true for ice skating with the additional thought of  being able to do it at my age.
  5.  Birds – Wednesday morning I heard them chirping and it was a beautiful sound.

The black-capped chickadee is the state bird of Massachusetts.

What are some things you are grateful for? Please tell me below in the comments.

 

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Completion

Yesterday I completed the chapter of my book on faculty wives that I have been working on for quite a while. I started the research last year and started writing it in July. Just like it is hard for a pitcher to close out innings it is hard for a writer to know when to stop writing. There is always more research to do and more books to read.

I decided it was finished because I can’t work on it any longer. I  have covered the points I wanted to make so I am going to put it aside and start something new. After writing a first draft of something, you need to let it sit for a while.

The chapter is about African-American faculty wives and their clubs. Several of the women became very prominent in the black community; some like Margaret Washington had stature in the white community as well. Most faculty wives clubs, black or white, were primarily focused on their academic community. The service they provided was most often to the school itself.

The first generation of African-American faculty wives operated on a larger stage. They used their position and connections to make a difference in the community their school was located in as well as in national organizations such as the National Association of Colored Women.

I also looked at clubs that fit the more typical pattern of inward involvement with their school. The Howard University Faculty Wives Association primarily focused on the school, setting up a scholarship and loan fund. In their programming, however, they  had a more global orientation, inviting the Haitian minister and his wife to an event as well as Mr. Francis Nwia- Kofi Nkrumah who later became the first president of Ghana.

The chapter started out one way and took a different focus after I had done more research. I learned a lot about both the writing process and African-American women and their history by doing this chapter.

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Ballantine Ale

Prior to German immigration to the United States following the Revolution of 1848, American brewers brewed ale in the English style. Once the German brewers started brewing lager beer, that style took off in popularity and eclipsed most of the ale brewers.

One brewery that persisted in brewing English style ale was Ballantine Beer. Peter Ballantine, a Scottish immigrant founded Ballantine Ale in Newark New Jersey, in 1833. By 1877 it was the nation’s fourth largest brewer and the only one that brewed ale exclusively.

During Prohibition Ballantine produced maple syrup to stay in business. After Repeal, Carl and Otto Badenhausen, brothers, purchased the brewery from the descendants of Peter Ballantine. The brothers hired a Scottish brewmaster so that the ale would remain a distinctive product. Ballantine sponsored radio broadcasts of the New York Yankees during the 1940’s and 50’s. In 1950 the company was the third largest in the country.

By the 1960’s the brewery was declining and Carl Badenhasuen first sold it to Investors funding Company, which was an investment firm. In 1972 the bankers sold the company to Falstaff. When Pabst purchased Falstaff in 1985, Ballantine became part of the Pabst stable of beers.

The Ballantine home is part of the Newark Museum. According to the New York Times, Thomas Jabor, a member of the Morris Area Society of Home Brewers, will be offering a four session course on brewing beer at Ballantine House in Newark.

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Always Taxes

At the latest Alcohol Task Force sub-committee excise taxes came up again as an issue. The lone public health person strongly encouraged the committee to think about raising the state excise tax on liquor which hasn’t been increased since the 1970’s. The business people strongly objected. I tried to make the point, using the federal tax structure as an example, that there could be a way to raise taxes but protect smaller producers. The craft brewer on the committee protested, saying “I pay the same as Anheuser Busch.” This is just not true.

 Since 1976 small brewers have had a differential federal tax rate. The Beer Institute, the large brewers trade lobby, which is pushing the Craft Beverage Modernization and Tax Reform Act, legislation for tax relief, explains the tax structure:

“Existing federal excise taxes on beer are set at a rate of $18/barrel for brewers of more than 2 million barrels (62 million gallons, or the equivalent of 110 million six-packs) and all beer importers. Since the late 1970s, growth in the small brewing sector has been encouraged by tax credits offered to brewers which produce less than 2 million barrels, cutting their excise tax rate to $7/barrel on the first 60,000 barrels and allowing them a far lower overall effective tax rate on all barrels up to 2 million.”

The craft brewer was totally unaware of this. He apparently has software which calculates his tax rate and that is the extent of his knowledge about federal taxes. This points up a problem in messaging since both the Beer Institute and the Brewers Association, the craft brewers trade lobby, are pushing for taxes to be reduced. I am still of the opinion that they are very unlikely to succeed and the fact that brewers on the ground don’t even know it is an issue only strengths my position.

 

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Beer Festivals and Economic Development

This Saturday, in Hartford there will be the Small State Great Beer festival. This is the second for the event and they expected more than thirty-five brewers to participate. The beer festival was the idea of three young people with some connection to Hartford. It is being held downtown in Constitution Plaza.

Beer festivals like this are part of the growing trend of municipalities seeking economic development from craft brewing. I am currently serving on a subcommittee of the Massachusetts Alcohol Task Force ( You can read about that here).
My committee is looking at Public Health, Safety and Prevention. Another committee is looking at local economic development.

These two goals could be in conflict since increased economic development via craft brewing will most likely lead to more retail outlets and more drinking. One of the key points of the public health movement around alcohol  abuse is to try to reduce retail outlet density and control the amount of drinking that is done.

Both Massachusetts and Connecticut have a large number of craft breweries and both states as well as many others are seeking to obtain revenue from these establishments.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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The Art of the Deal

I consider myself a fairly astute political observer but I will confess I am extremely puzzled and concerned by the deal Trump and Democrats struck over raising the debt ceiling. Failure to raise the debt ceiling would result in the country defaulting; the deadline was looming. Since defaulting would obviously have very negative consequences for our economy, I assume the longer we could go before having to raise it again the better.

Apparently Steve Mnuchin, Secretary of the Treasury, and the Republicans wanted eighteen months. Although that seems like a good idea, I don’t trust the Republicans so I assume they had ulterior motives or a hidden agenda, The Democrats counter offer was three months and they didn’t budge. Since there was no back and forth of offers and no compromise in the middle you can’t really call it a deal. It is more like Trump caved.

However the media seems to be spinning it as an example of Trump’s deal making. Trump sees it as a win and is ecstatic about positive press coverage. This is one of the things that concerns me about the deal. I think independents may look at it and think Trump is being bipartisan, something Obama couldn’t achieve. Of course, the reality is that Democrats generally care more about governing and it is therefore easier for a Republican president to be bipartisan. Republicans revel in being in the opposition, don’t really care about governing and are usually really bad at it. All of that made it very hard for Obama who wanted bipartisanship to achieve it.

I don’t want this to improve Trump’s approval level in polls and increase his chances for reelection. I don’t know why the Democrats are helping him to get a win. Apparently they wanted the short time frame to maintain or increase leverage on DACA and other key issues.This feels like a gamble to me since there is no guarantee that in December there will be enough Republicans to form a coalition with Democrats to pass the Dream Act in the House. The extreme political nature of this is upsetting. The short time period before the debt ceiling has to be raised again and Trump getting a win are both bad for the country which is my bottom line.

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Back to School Report

September always feels like the end of summer and the beginning of the school year. I am not in school anymore, but September still feels like the start of something new. Given that, here is an update on my social media and book writing goals.

Since my Quarterly Report in April, I have tweeted 222 times. My total for the year so far is 2317. If I didn’t tweet anymore this year I would still have met my goal of 365 new tweets. My top tweet since April was about the Jerusalem Church in Bruges, Belgium. I have 123 followers which is not a lot but it took me forever to get to 100 followers so that number is fine with me.

Tweeting every day has remained very easy. If I do miss a day, I usually wind up tweeting at least twice the next day. The current political situation makes that a snap. At the very least there are excellent tweets available for retweeting.

Blogging every week continues to be more difficult. My personal life has been so hectic that I haven’t been able to stay on my preferred schedule of writing on Thursday and posting on Friday.

There is a positive reason I have had  trouble blogging. Since July I have been working on my book about faculty wives two to three days a week. At the beginning of that month I had 17 pages on the chapter I am currently writing and I now have 43 pages. I had done a bunch of research in the winter on the National Association of Colored Women’s Clubs (NACW) and I  am now using that research to write the chapter on African American faculty wives clubs.

One reason I wanted to blog more regularly was that I hoped it would help me with my writing. That has happened which  makes me very happy. Hopefully I can figure out how to do both.  In December or January I will let you know how it turned out.

 

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Death

There was recently a death in my family. Several other people I know have also lost members of their families recently. In honor of all these losses, I offer two poems that I have found comforting and meaningful at times of sorrow. I read this poem by Edna St. Vincent Millay at my brother’s memorial service several years ago. She is one of my favorite poets. 

Dirge without Music
by Edna St. Vincent Millay

I am not resigned to the shutting away of loving hearts in the hard ground.
So it is, and so it will be, for so it has been, time out of mind:
Into the darkness they go, the wise and the lovely. Crowned
With lilies and with laurel they go; but I am not resigned.

Lovers and thinkers, into the earth with you.
Be one with the dull, the indiscriminate dust.
A fragment of what you felt, of what you knew,
A formula, a phrase remains,—but the best is lost.

The answers quick and keen, the honest look, the laughter, the
love,—
They are gone. They are gone to feed the roses. Elegant and curled
Is the blossom. Fragrant is the blossom. I know. But I do not
approve.
More precious was the light in your eyes than all the roses in the
world.

Down, down, down into the darkness of the grave
Gently they go, the beautiful, the tender, the kind;
Quietly they go, the intelligent, the witty, the brave.
I know. But I do not approve. And I am not resigned.

I saw the following poem on a subway in New York City. I find it very moving.

Heaven
by Patrick Phillips

It will be the past
and we’ll live there together.

Not as it was to live
but as it is remembered.

It will be the past.
We’ll all go back together.

Everyone we ever loved,
and lost, and must remember.

It will be the past.
And it will last forever.

“Heaven” by Patrick Phillips, from Boy. © The University of Georgia Press, 2008. Reprinted with permission.

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Computer Troubles

Since Monday I have been dealing with a failing computer.  It stopped charging and since then only charges when the cord is in a very specific position. There is obviously something wrong with the charging port. This is always the weak link on PC laptops. I don’t like MACs but their power cords are magnetic and make much more sense.

My computer is a Samsung ATIV Book 9 Plus and it has had problems for a while.  When I have a browser open and have another window open as well like my email it can freeze when moving the cursor from one window to another. The only way to fix it is to reboot.  At other times Firefox will just freeze and go to a blue screen with a black box on the top.

When this first started happening, I reinstalled both Windows and Firefox. That didn’t help so I called Samsung because  I had owned it for less than a year. They wanted me to do a full recovery which I did. That also didn’t help.

Since the problem was intermittent I decided to ignore it. This spring it started getting worse and I called Square Trade since I had bought an extended warranty from them. They wanted me to send them the computer. I didn’t want to do that so I once again ignored the problem.

Now my power port is broken and I have to send it to Square Trade. I am reluctant to do this for two reasons. One I am afraid they will wipe out my data and I will have to reinstall all my programs and settings. The other reason is that it is hard to be without a computer for at least five days.

I don’t think I would buy a Samsung computer again. I also used to have a Samsung phone and that wasn’t a very good product either. I would like a laptop that will last at least three years and maybe four. If anyone has a suggestion please let me know.

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Alcohol Task Force Sub Group

On Wednesday, I attended the first meeting, via Zoom, of the Alcohol Task Force sub group on Public Health, Safety and Prevention. The chair, Lisa Wong, laid out the areas we will focus on in making our recommendations to the State Treasurer. They include education, data, college drinking, funding of prevention including an alcohol tax, advertising and the role of technology.

Much of the discussion focused on the role of education and the level of awareness of the general public about some of the harmful effects of alcohol.  The group includes people from the liquor industry as well as public health advocates. It will be interesting to see how the chair and the committee balance the economic imperative  of robust alcohol sales with the need to keep the public safe.

I will keep you posted about how the deliberations go.

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