Me-Too and the Craft Brewing Industry

Last year, in the aftermath of the George Floyd’s murder, the craft brewing industry confronted racism in their industry. You can read about one response here. This spring they are now realizing how much sexism and misogyny exists in craft brewing.

Last month Brienne Allan, who works at Notch Brewing in Salem, Massachusetts, posted on Instagram about her negative experiences working in the craft brewing industry which is overwhelmingly white and male. She got over 1,000 responses. You can read more about that here.

Here is a very brief excerpt from Brewing Battles about one woman in the brewing industry in the 1930’s in the post-Repeal period.

The newly legal brewers were also concerned with advertising and promoting beer as a distinct and pleasurable product to a public, which might have forgotten its existence. Of particular importance to brewers were “the men and women who were boys and girls in 1919” who “represented a tremendous new market with new habits and new buying perspectives.”[1] Of course the vast majority of pre-Prohibition brewers, local in nature and relying overwhelmingly on a male, working class population for its clientele in the saloon, had never approached marketing in quite this way.

Prior to Prohibition, public drinking in saloons had an overwhelmingly male face; from 1919 to 1933, both men and women drank in public at speakeasies and other illicit watering holes. Drinking became a companionate social activity. Brewers knew they would have to address their marketing to both men and women.

One way to begin to create a beverage that would appeal equally to both sexes was to employ women in the industry. Brewing was overwhelmingly male, but by 1937 Modern Brewer had unearthed two female beer sales personnel. The journal also had a woman, Elsie Singruen, as its technical editor. Ms. Singruen had studied brewing in Berlin, and had written on brewing techniques and the history of the craft. The technician made further history when she addressed the Philadelphia District Master Brewers in 1938. Ms. Singruen, the first female to speak publicly before a brewers group, gave a talk on “the history of American Brewing Literature.[2]

[1] Modern Brewer, March 1933, 22.

[2] Modern Brewer, May 1937, 25; December 1937, 64;  April 1938, 39.

© Amy Mittelman 2021

 

Old Age

I recently completed the sixth chapter of my manuscript, The Real Housewives of Academe. “Civil Obedience” deals with activism in the 1950s and 60s and faculty wives who fought for social justice.

One of the people I discuss is Sarah Patton Boyle. She became an early white supporter of civil rights in her hometown of Charlottesville, Virginia.

After spending fifteen years as an active participant in the movement, she retired, got divorced, and moved, at the age of sixty, to Arlington, Virginia, to start her life over.

Below is an excerpt about Boyle from the first draft of my chapter, “Civil Obedience”

In 1983 at the age of 77, Sarah-Patton Boyle published her third book, The Desert Blooms: A personal adventure in growing old creatively. The Desert Blooms is a memoir about a more private and personal chapter of her life.[1] It detailed her journey from the University of Virginia, Charlottesville where she had been a faculty wife for many years to Arlington, Virginia at the age of 60.

Patty had decided to move because much of her life had changed. “My children were far away, intent on finding mates and creating careers. The Southern civil rights revolution of the 1950s, which had riveted my attention and drained my energies for fifteen years, had changed direction and was moving swiftly away from my area of competence and commitment.”[2]

Although Patty was leaving the life she had known and moving by herself to a completely new place, she “lacked the sense to be frightened. … Nothing could be worse than the ordeals I had already weathered, I thought.  Hadn’t I even survived my husband’s announcement that when the last of our children left home, he would too? “[3]

Patty had enjoyed being a housewife and mother while she was doing it but “my unlived life had beckoned often and the thought had occurred to me now and then that nothing held me back but a ball and chain. So now that liberty was thrust unsought upon me, I resolved to focus, not on what I had lost, but on what I would gain.”[4]

Religion was very important to Patty so she looked for a church to belong to in her new city. She found a church that she initially felt comfortable in, forming a relationship with the minister and his wife. The minister sought to change the church and believed that Patty would assist him in this work. “Knowing I had opposed the old guard on civil rights in the 1950s, he thought I would oppose it in this case, too.” Patty was not as on board with changing the church as the minister initially believed. ”His sudden silences, I now know, resulted from doubt that he was right.”

Patty had relied heavily on religion to get her through the difficult years of her involvement with the civil rights movement. “During the black revolution, when I had /battled on the minority side of what was the nation’s hottest issue, a stream of threats and insults had descended on me that only my faith had enabled me to survive. Traditional Christianity had been for me no candy bar but the staff of life.”[6]

Patty’s disappointment in her new church, the minister and his wife led her to feel old in a way that she had never experienced before. “It was now several months since I had recognized that I was old. But shocked as I had been at first, I had not felt old. Now I did. It wasn’t a feeling of accumulated years so much as one of having outlived my power to achieve anything – a feeling of not having any life ahead of me but only behind me, of having passed from anticipation into merely marking time.”[7]

[1] Jennifer Rittenhouse, “Speaking of race : Sarah Patton Boyle and the “T.J. Sellers course for backward southern whites” in Martha Hodes, ed.  Sex, love, race : crossing boundaries in North American history, New York : New York University Press, c1999, p. 493.

[2] Desert, p. 19

[3] Desert, 20

[4] Desert, 22

[5] Desert, 56.

[6] Desert, p, 99-100

[7] Desert, p. 104.

© Copyright 2020 Do Not Reproduce without the Author’s Permission.

 

 

 

 

 

To Xfinity and Beyond

The title  is a reference to Toy Story but this post is about the trouble we have been having with our Wi-Fi. A few years ago we switched from having Verizon provide our landline phone service and Wi-Fi. The service was always going out and and we had a lot of problems.

Once we switched to Xfinity (Comcast) as our provider we got much better service and we were really happy. The first year it was also cheaper so that was an added bonus.

Last week we started losing Wi-Fi and  Comcast reset it. A few days after that, we realized our devices that run on 2.4 Ghz were not working. Trying to resolve this took most of one day and  the printer and other things still weren’t operating correctly.

We scheduled a repair visit for this coming Monday, but yesterday someone called and tried, once again, to fix the problem. When that didn’t work, he advised us to go to an Xfinity store and exchange our modem which is also a router.

Today we undid the modem, losing Wi-Fi and phone service in the process and drove to the Springfield store which is about 25 miles away. The Xfinity store is really nice looking. I think  Comcast has beefed up their retail outlets to compete with Apple stores.

We got the new modem and even negotiated a price decrease since our cable bill has crept up over the last few years. We ate a near by Applebee’s – the first time in ten years or so – and then drove home.

It was fairly simple to set up the  internet and tv and the printer works again. The landline phone took longer; the whole ordeal was over an hour. Now everything is working and it is going to cost less. Win-Win.

I do feel like I have been living a Job like existence. I realize many of my problems are first-world concerns but it has still been stressful

Just for fun. Here is Buzz Lightyear:

Over 400 Served

I have been so busy that a milestone passed and I didn’t even acknowledge it. Apparently my April 4 post, “Busy Week” was my 400th. When I publish this post, I will have 407 WordPress posts. Adding in the 38 post I did before I was using WordPress, the grand total is 445.

I started blogging to promote Brewing Battles but it has taken on a life of its own. When I made the commitment, a few years ago, to post weekly, my pace picked up. Keeping that commitment has been difficulty sometimes, but now that I see what I have  amassed, I am glad I have kept doing it.

My top post, all time, is Methylated Spirits. The home page is a not close second. Except for views of the home page, which is always my most recent post and my Twitter feed, none of the top ten posts are from this year. Poppins on the Roof, which was my most read post for a while, is now number 30 on the all time list.

The past seven days, I had 156 views and the top posts were still Methylated Spirits and the Home Page. Other popular post were from the last year, including The Mysteries of Udolpho.

It has taken me 14 years to write  445 posts. Since I now try to post weekly, the next 400 should take only 8 years. I will try to do that.